Church-Unity

Church-Unity is a problem that must be solved

The Church that Christ Founded is one Holy Catholic and Apostolic



The Christian Church attempts to give a witness to the existance of God to a world that does not believe in God. But the Church's testimony is compromised by the dividedness of the Church.

Many people reason that since the Christians cannot get along with each other, why should they be listened to? They feel that if the Christian religion were the true religion then they would be able to be united into one Christian Church.

This writer experiences the scandal of a divided church every time he goes to his congregation. On the way, I pass a Roman Catholic church, a Lutheran church, a Baptist Church, two presbyterian churches, a Korean Reformed church, another Korean congregation and then as I approach my own Lutheran church, I look directly across the street to an Episcopal church. The distance from my home to my congregation is one mile!

The people in these congregations say that they worship the same God, the same Jesus. They recite the same Apostle's creed. They have fundamentally the same view of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus the Messiah. And they proclaim that philosophically and theologically the Christian Church is One, Holy, Catholic, Orthodox, and Apostolic Church. Yet, they cannot worship together.

Those who do not believe in God and the Christian religion look at the division of the Church and the mutually exclusive practices of the Church as being absolute proof that what they preach is not what they really believe. Such persons will proclaim that if the Christian Church really believed all of the things that they profess, then they would be able to overcome the divisions of the past. If they really believed that the Church was One Holy Catholic Orthodox and Apostolic then they would be able to achieve organizational union.

Cardinal Kasper of the Roman Catholic Church recently declared that the continued voluntary dis unity of the Christian Church is a Scandal and a sin.